Berthe Morisot
Berthe Morisot's Oil Paintings
Berthe Morisot Museum
January 14, 1841 -- March 2, 1895, French impressionist.

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Here are all the paintings of John Martin 01

ID Painting  Oil Pantings, Sorted from A to Z     Painting Description
28220 Belshazzar's Feast John Martin Belshazzar's Feast 1820 oil on canvas 95.3 x 120.6 cm (37 1/2 x 47 1/2 in) Yale Center for British Art Paul Mellon Collection New Haven CT.(mk63)
94518 Belshazzar's Feast. John Martin Belshazzar's Feast. 1820(1820) cjr
66582 Der grobe Tag des gottlichen Zorns John Martin Der grobe Tag des gottlichen Zorns c. 1853 Oil on canvas 196,5 ?? 303 cm
21761 Joshua Ordering the Sun to Stop in its Course (mk10) John Martin Joshua Ordering the Sun to Stop in its Course (mk10) 1816 Oil on canvas 149.8 x 231.1 cm London,United Grand Lodge of Great Britain
73451 Macbeth John Martin Macbeth Macbeth" (circa 1820). National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh. cjr
75142 Macbeth John Martin Macbeth "Macbeth" (circa 1820). National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh. cyf
43938 Manfred and the Alpine Witch John Martin Manfred and the Alpine Witch 1837 Watercolour, 388 x 558 mm
26148 Manfred and the Witch of the Alps (mk47) John Martin Manfred and the Witch of the Alps (mk47) SBA 1838 Watercolour and bodycolour 388x558mm Whitworth Art Gallery University of Manchester
94977 Manfred on the Jungfrau John Martin Manfred on the Jungfrau 1837 Type Watercolour cyf
22806 Pandemonium (mk22) John Martin Pandemonium (mk22) 1841 Oil on canvas,123.2 x 184.1 cm New York,FORBES Magazine Collection
74134 Pandemonium - One out of a set of mezzotints with the same title John Martin Pandemonium - One out of a set of mezzotints with the same title Pandemonium - One out of a set of mezzotints with the same title Between 1823 and 1827
77598 Portrait of Catherine Parr John Martin Portrait of Catherine Parr ca. 1545(1545) Medium Oil on panel Dimensions 180.3 ?? 94 cm (71 ?? 37 in) cyf
92953 Sadak in Search of the Waters of Oblivion John Martin Sadak in Search of the Waters of Oblivion 1812(1812) Medium oil on canvas Dimensions 72 1/8 x 51 5/8 in. (183.2 x 131.1 cm) cjr
70859 Seventh Plague John Martin Seventh Plague Medium Oil on canvas Dimensions 144.1 x 214 cm
28219 The Assuaging of the Waters John Martin The Assuaging of the Waters 1834-40 Oil on canvas 143.5 x 218 cm (56 1/2 x 86 1/4 in)Fine Arts Museum San Francisco (mk63)
44039 The Bard John Martin The Bard c. 1817 Oil on canvas, 127 x 102 cm
72021 The Bard John Martin The Bard ca. 1817 Oil on canvas 127 X 102 cm (50 X 40.16 in)
73517 The Bard John Martin The Bard Date ca. 1817 Medium Oil on canvas Dimensions 127 X 102 cm (50 X 40.16 in) cyf
21766 The Bard (mk10) John Martin The Bard (mk10) 1817,Oil on canvas, 215 x 157 cm Newcastle-upon-Tyne,The Laing Art Gallery
67008 The Deluge John Martin The Deluge 1834 Oil on canvas 66 x 102 inches
59759 The Destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, John Martin The Destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, The Destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, 1852.
44045 The Eve of the Deluge John Martin The Eve of the Deluge 1840 Oil on canvas, 143 x 218 cm
62815 The Eve of the Deluge John Martin The Eve of the Deluge 1840 Oil on canvas, 143 x 218 cm Royal Collection, Windsor John Martin had humble beginnings in Newcastle-upon-Tyne as a herald painter to a coach-builder, and then in London as a painter on china and glass, but he later achieved a great success with his highly imaginative paintings of scenes from a variety of literary sources, particularly the Old Testament. Many of these pictures were executed on a vast scale and were frequently visionary in conception. The impact of Martin's paintings was also enhanced by his use of vivid contrasts in colour, which served to emphasise the grandeur and other-worldliness of his compositions, and the varying thickness of the paint surface. Apart from his paintings Martin was also a prolific illustrator and engraver, as well as a practising urban engineer. It was while Prince Albert was visiting Martin's studio that he saw one of the artist's major works, The Deluge (the second version of 1834, present whereabouts unknown), and suggested that the artist paint the related themes - The Eve of the Deluge and The Assuaging of the Waters - in order to make a series. It would seem, however, that the artist himself had already developed the idea for such a sequence. The subject of The Eve of the Deluge is ultimately based on Genesis 6:5-8, in which God despairs of man's wickedness on earth and decides to destroy him with the single exception of Noah. The figures on the promontory in the foreground are the patriarchs. The seated figure with a white beard is Methuselah, who is surrounded by the family of Noah. Methuselah instructs Noah to open the scroll written by his father, Enoch, so that he can compare the signs in the sky (sun, moon and comet) with those on the scroll. The fact that they match ordains the end of the world and this results in Methuselah's death. The figures hurrying up the slope include those described in the Bible as 'giants in the earth in those days'. In the middle distance, under the trees on the right, is a group of revellers representing the antediluvian age. Their behaviour has no doubt undermined God's confidence in man. Ravens, a symbol of ill omen, circle overhead. The ark, which Noah was instructed to build in order to save himself, his family and the animals, is visible on a distant promontory in the background on the right. Both The Eve of the Deluge and The Assuaging of the Waters were exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1840, and The Eve of the Deluge was acquired by Prince Albert the following year. The Assuaging of the Waters is now in San Francisco Museum of Fine Arts. Martin published his own account of these three paintings in a pamphlet entitled The Deluge of 1840. This shows that his sources were fairly recondite, extending beyond the historical and the religious to the cosmological and the eschatological, including Byron's Heaven and Earth. 'Altogether the three paintings amount to a history of the world, summarized in the terms of documentary mythology and dioramic episodes, compressed into three scenes - evening,
79028 The Eve of the Deluge John Martin The Eve of the Deluge 1840(1840) Oil on canvas Width: 218 cm (85.8 in). Height: 143 cm (56.3 in). cjr
24171 The Eve of the Deluge (mk25) John Martin The Eve of the Deluge (mk25) 1840
52540 The Evening of the Deluge John Martin The Evening of the Deluge 1828 Mezzotint and engraving, 597 x 817 mm
23371 The Great Day of His Wirath (nn03) John Martin The Great Day of His Wirath (nn03) c 1853 Oil on canvas 196 x 303 cm 77 3/8 119 3/8 in Tate Gallery London
2884 The Great Day of His Wrath John Martin The Great Day of His Wrath c1853 Tate Gallery, London
40703 The Great Day of His Wrath John Martin The Great Day of His Wrath mk156 1851 Oil on canvas 196x303cm
59758 The Great Day of His Wrath John Martin The Great Day of His Wrath The Great Day of His Wrath, c. 1853.
68860 the great day of his wrath John Martin the great day of his wrath 1851-3 oil on canvas 196.5x303.2cm se
67009 The Last Judgement John Martin The Last Judgement 1853 Oil on canvas 1968 x 3258 mm
67767 The Last Judgement John Martin The Last Judgement 1853 Oil on canvas 1968 x 3258 mm
70248 The Last Judgement John Martin The Last Judgement Medium Oil on canvas Dimensions 1968 x 3258 mm
67010 The Last Man John Martin The Last Man 1849 Oil on canvas
70231 The Last Man John Martin The Last Man Medium Oil on canvas Dimensions
70536 The Plains of Heaven John Martin The Plains of Heaven Medium Oil on canvas Dimensions 1988 x 3067 mm
67011 The Seventh Plague John Martin The Seventh Plague Oil on canvas 144.1 x 214 cm 1823
96090 The Stables Viewed from the Chateau at Versailles John Martin The Stables Viewed from the Chateau at Versailles between 1688(1688) and 1690(1690) Medium oil on canvas cyf
96091 View of the Orangerie John Martin View of the Orangerie between 1688(1688) and 1690(1690) Medium oil on canvas cyf

John Martin
British 1789-1854 John Martin Gallery His first exhibited subject picture, Sadak in Search of the Waters of Oblivion (now in the St. Louis Art Museum), was hung in the Ante-room of the Royal Academy in 1812, and sold for fifty guineas. It was followed by the Expulsion (1813), Paradise (1813), Clytie (1814), and Joshua Commanding the Sun to Stand Still upon Gibeon (1816). In 1821 appeared his Belshazzar's Feast, which excited much favorable and hostile comment, and was awarded a prize of £200 at the British Institution, where the Joshua had previously carried off a premium of £100. Then came the Destruction of Herculaneum (1822), the Creation (1824), the Eve of the Deluge (1841), and a series of other Biblical and imaginative subjects. The Plains of Heaven is thought to reflect his memories of the Allendale of his youth. Martin's large paintings were inspired by "contemporary dioramas or panoramas, popular entertainments in which large painted cloths were displayed, and animated by the skilful use of artificial light. Martin has often been claimed as a forerunner of the epic cinema, and there is no doubt that the pioneer director D. W. Griffith was aware of his work." In turn, the diorama makers borrowed Martin's work, to the point of plagiarism. A 2000-square-foot version of Belshazzar's Feast was mounted at a facility called the British Diorama in 1833; Martin tried, but failed, to shut down the display with a court order. Another diorama of the same picture was staged in New York City in 1835. These dioramas were tremendous successes with their audiences, but wounded Martin's reputation in the serious art world.
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